Modelling

In order to fully account for the atmosphere-ocean carbon exchange in the Southern Ocean, it has become increasingly important to resolve and understand the small-scale features of the upper ocean.

One of the tools, SOCCO uses to understand the upper ocean and its exchanges are numerical ocean models. SOCCO uses the NEMO ocean modelling platform which includes interacting ocean, ice and biogeochemical models. The question of spatial scale on the upper ocean processes can be examined using a suite of models: ranging from global coarse-resolution (2º) to finer-scale regional ocean models (½, 1/12º) with the eventual goal to model a localised region of the Southern Ocean at very high resolution (1/36º), corresponding to the domain of the high-resolution in situ sampling campaign of SOSCEX .

Using these model configurations, researchers and students are able to understand processes and compare them to observations. These may help account for the differences between observations and the models that are used in long-term climate prediction.

  • Global ocean-ice-biogeochemistry configuration ORCA2, January-mean SST.
  • Total chlorophyll for the regional 0.5 degree ocean-ice-bigeochemistry model configuration (BIOSATLANTIC05).
  • EKE for the regional 0.5 degree ocean-ice model configuration (SATLANTIC05).
  • EKE for the regional 1/12 degree ocean-ice model configuration (SATLANTIC12).
Related News and Publications

In order to fully account for the atmosphere-ocean carbon exchange in the Southern Ocean, it has become increasingly important to resolve and understand the small-scale features of the upper ocean.

One of the tools, SOCCO uses to understand the upper ocean and its exchanges are numerical ocean models. SOCCO uses the NEMO ocean modelling platform which includes interacting ocean, ice and biogeochemical models. The question of spatial scale on the upper ocean processes can be examined using a suite of models: ranging from global coarse-resolution (2º) to finer-scale regional ocean models (½, 1/12º) with the eventual goal to model a localised region of the Southern Ocean at very high resolution (1/36º), corresponding to the domain of the high-resolution in situ sampling campaign of SOSCEX .

Using these model configurations, researchers and students are able to understand processes and compare them to observations. These may help account for the differences between observations and the models that are used in long-term climate prediction.

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