The global oceans are estimated to contribute an impressive 50-85% of the oxygen (O2) present in the earth’s atmosphere. It is often assumed the Amazon and other reputable rainforests are responsible for atmospheric O2, however rainforests only cover 2% of the earth’s total surface area; the oceans cover a remarkable 71%. From the Blue Planet Continue Reading

Written by Sarah Wild for Mail and Guardian 21 August 2015  The stormy waters south of the Cape suck carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and are key to understanding what will happen to our climate as the Earth heats up. The storms are part of the reason the Southern Ocean is one of the most Continue Reading

The Southern Ocean is a key component of the earth system, being responsible for 50% of ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 and 30% of carbon export flux to the deep ocean. Introduction Climate models and decadal data sets predict changes in the Earth’s climate that will influence the effectiveness of the Southern Ocean CO2 sink Continue Reading

    A changing climate has brought the Southern Ocean into sharp focus, not only due to the physical changes we are observing in the ice levels and sea surface temperatures around Antarctica, and their effect on currents, but on the biology and life within the oceans. When sailing across the oceans, you notice their Continue Reading

They are heading out past the breakwater to deploy this wave glider, which will begin its month-long journey to the Southern Ocean, and they are racing against the oncoming storm. These storms are part of the reason that the Southern Ocean is one of the most under-researched in the world, even though it absorbs almost Continue Reading

This voyage combined the annual transportation of relief and logistics supplies, and the ferrying of the SANAE over-wintering team to South Africa’s Antarctic base, with the Southern Ocean Carbon Climate Observatory (SOCCO) research programme led by the CSIR. According to CSIR ocean systems and climate chief scientist and head of the SOCCO programme, Dr Pedro Continue Reading

The reason we care about this increase in CO is because of concerns over climate change. CO is a greenhouse gas which means that it absorbs outgoing longwave radiation and thus warms the atmosphere. Of the approximately 3 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO) pumped into the atmosphere annually by human activities, less than half stays there, Continue Reading